Effects of Good Posture versus Bad

Over time, your body tends to bend forward, moving from your centre of balance the same direction, making your body unstable as you walk and increasing your chances of falling down.  Similarly, adaptive patterns of movement can increase the stress on your joints.  For instance, frequently slouching puts pressure on your vertebrae, ultimately causing discs to become compressed and resulting in neck and back pain. Conversely, good posture makes you feel better.  Your muscles are more limber, and you have better mobility and less tension in your neck and shoulders, back, legs and spine.  Thus, having a good posture is very important to preventing pain and maintaining better balance.

To help you keen an upright posture, you use your eyes to gauge what is level (which is why balance exercises are harder with your eyes shut), along with sensory information from you inner ears, muscles and joints.  If something affects the way you carry your body, your brain adapts and adopts new muscle and joint positions.  To avoid undue pain, you may temporarily adopt a new movement pattern, such as when one of your hips hurts.  As a result, you’ll think that you are standing straight up even when you aren’t.  Muscles, ligaments and nerves change as they adapt to changes in your movement patterns.

POSTURE IS REFLECTION OF HOW YOU BALANCE YOUR BODY, WHICH WOULD FALL FORWARD IF YOUR MUSCLES DID NOT PULL IT BACK.

 

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